GanjAmerica: How your Community Can Easily Host Pro-pot Events

One of the better messages that a pro-pot community can provide is how cool everyone is and that the residents weren’t wrong to vote it in. At the same time, people interested in the industry may appreciate opportunities to learn more in an informal setting.

-93ad37f693be330f

With more states legalizing recreational marijuana in the last few years, more people are talking about pot.

Some people who never gave much thought to the formerly illegal substance are now learning all about its usages and ways to be enjoyed. Those who were part of the counter-culture and underground pot world who knew all about it are now using this formerly illicit info to their advantage: they’re opening or working at retail shops, becoming producers or processors, or generally helping grow a new industry.

If someone falls into any of these camps, or anything in between, it’s time to celebrate!

One of the better messages that a pro-pot community can provide is how cool everyone is and that the residents weren’t wrong to vote it in. At the same time, people interested in the industry may appreciate opportunities to learn more in an informal setting.

That’s why public marijuana events can be helpful to get the word out. They can be chances for retailers and producers to put aside their business competition and focus on education. They also can be opportunities for affiliated industries to show that they’re interested in helping people with everything from real estate to financial management.

For people planning marijuana events, consider these ideas:

  • Check with local municipalities. Organizers likely will need a permit for any kind of gathering, whether it’s in a public space or private property. Though possession of personal amounts of pot may be legal in a state or city, there may be restrictions on large numbers of people smoking it or promoting it in a public venue. Or perhaps any vendors may be allowed to give out information about their products or pot in general but legally aren’t allowed to give out samples. States where marijuana is still illegal may allow a rally under the First Amendment, but could place restrictions.
  •  Invite law enforcement. This could be an excellent opportunity for local authorities to show that they’re aware of the new rules changes and willing to comply with them. It also can provide a chance to remind partakers of the rules (possessing too much pot, selling or growing it illegally, driving while intoxicated, using other still-illegal drugs.)
  • Get media coverage. Start with showing local reporters around which can let readers/viewers know that something interesting is happening. Then invite national pot-friendly media. Consider acquiring sponsorships with local broadcasters or national pot companies.

Save

Save

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY